Carhartt WIP feature med kunst duo OrtaMiklos

OrtaMiklos

 

Herunder er et uddrag fra Issue 03 of WIP Magazine, der nu er tilgængelig i Carhartt WIP Stores.

 

Squat from the outside and luminous inside, legend has it that the San Pancrazio church in Florence was founded by Charlemagne, the former Holy Roman Emperor, at the beginning of the Middle Ages. For centuries, it was a church and monastery, until it was deconsecrated in 1808 after an edict by the Napoleonic government which ruled the city. The space would house the city’s tribunals, lotteries, and even a tobacco factory in the years that followed.

Converted by Brutalist architects Bruno Sacchi and Lorenzo Papi into a gallery in 1976, it is now dedicated to the works of Marino Marini, the Italian artist whose equestrian sculptures document the traumas and transformations of the 20th century. Today, it represents more than over a millennium of labour: thirteen centuries of faith, art, and industry under one roof.

Earlier this year, as part of the 95th edition of Pitti Uomo – the menswear trade show in Florence – Italian streetwear distributor and retailer Slam Jam was invited to present a decidedly modern reading on what streetwear means in 2019. The three floors of the San Pancrazio, known today as the Museo Marino Marini, were given over to Slam Jam’s regular collaborators: Stussy, Nike, and Carhartt WIP.

In collaboration with Milan-based art magazine Kaleidoscope, Carhartt WIP presented the secretive artist-designer pairing OrtaMiklos. Taking saws and claw-hammers to monumental blocks of expanded polystyrene, the Danish-French duo filled the hall with the smell of spray-paint and epoxy resin as they created a series of objects called Icebergs. The works brought to mind that of Donald Judd’s furniture, if it were somehow placed in the context of a post-nuclear fallout, or glaciers, if they had been designed by architect Louis Kahn. These functional art-slash-conceptual furniture pieces were lent a sense of motion. Throughout the evening, each stage in the objects’ making was enacted by masked performers, clothed in pieces of Carhartt WIP, similar to those customized by OrtaMiklos to accompany the exhibition. It was work in progress in its most rabid, structured, and iridescent sense. A forceful reminder that our work and our world is in a process of coming to be, in all its violent, strange beauty.

 

Læs mere i et interview med OrtaMiklos her.

 

 

OrtaMiklos

 

OrtaMiklos

 

OrtaMiklos

 

A momentary escape to